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Ford GT40 - 1969 Le Mans Winner Hi-Tech Model

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Ford GT40 - 1969 Le Mans winner
1:18 ratio

Exactly like Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver won at Le Mans in 1969. This model is almost 20 inches (50 cm) long

One of the most iconic race cars of all time, the Ford GT40 was born out of one of motorsport's most notorious grudges. After failing to win the prestigious Enzo Ferrari firm, Henry Ford II came back empty-handed and announced that he wanted to beat Ferrari at Le Mans. The result is a car that will beat all that came before it.

Produced for five years between 1964 and 1969, the development of the GT40 was particularly improvised. Despite Ford's great wealth and production capacity, as an organization they have little to no racing experience. Ford negotiated a deal with UK-based Lola Cars owner and chief designer Eric Broadley, sending British engineer Roy Lunn back to the UK to play a key role in the project. Under the supervision of American designer Harley Copp, the Broadley team, Lunn and former Aston Martin team boss John Wyer began designing the new car at Lola's factory in Bromley. At the end of 1963, the team moved to Slough, under Wyer's management, at the newly established headquarters of Ford Advanced Vehicles. Bruce McLaren of McLaren Automotive was brought in to evaluate the prototype in August 1963 and work progressed rapidly. although it was barely completed in time for the opening. On April 1, 1964, the first GT40, the GT/101 (the name "GT40" came later, was taken from the height of the car: 40 inches above the top of the windscreen), introduced in the UK April 1. 1964, and in New York shortly after the show.

1966 marked the beginning of the GT40 legend. Another win at Sebring was soon followed by a 1-2-3 victory at Daytona. Ford, however, coveted a Le Mans title. Ford assembled an army for the race that year: 9 cars, more than 100 troops and 21 tons of spare parts. Ford beat Ferrari in style, finishing on the top three podiums and becoming the first American manufacturer to win at Le Mans. The GT40 won Le Mans three years in a row, making the GT40 one of the most iconic racing cars of all time.

Restored all the details of the original car, including the interior of the vehicle, tires, engine, etc.

  • As raced in 1969 at Le Mans by Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver
    Each model built by hand and assembled by a small team of craftsmen
    1:18 scale model, over 25 cm / 10 inches long
    Made with the best quality materials.
    More than 4000 hours to develop the model.
    Over 400 hours to build each model
    Thousands of precision-engineered parts: castings, photo-etched parts, and CNC-machined metal components

Buy now and come with a Giclée art print of a beautiful photo of Rainer Schlegelmilch taken in the early stages of the 1969 Le Mans 24 Hours.

Make it one of your precious collectibles.

  • Limited to just 199 pieces.
    As raced in 1969 at Le Mans by Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver
    Each model built by hand and assembled by a small team of craftsmen
    1:8 scale model, over 25 cm /10 inches long
    Made with the best quality materials.
    More than 4000 hours to develop the model.
    Over 400 hours to build each model
    Thousands of precision-engineered parts: castings, photo-etched parts, and CNC-machined metal components
    Built with the assistance and cooperation of the Ford Heritage and Archives Department and Gulf Oil International

The first 50 models ordered will be accompanied by a Giclée print of a beautiful photograph by Rainer Schlegelmilch taken in the early stages of the 1969 Le Mans 24 Hours. The Giclée print will be on archival quality fine art paper, sized at image approximately 30x45cm (12x18in).

After 24 months of in-depth research and development work, with the assistance and cooperation of the Ford Heritage and Archives Department and Gulf Oil International, Amalgam Collection today revealed the first images of its extraordinarily detailed model of the Ford GT40. Based on chassis #1075, the model represents Ford's most famous racing car, exactly as Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver drove it to victory at Le Mans in 1969. At nearly 20 inches (51 cm) long, this model is limited to just 199 pieces.

One of the most iconic racing cars of all time, the Ford GT40 was born out of motorsports most infamous grudge. After failing to secure possession of Enzo Ferrari's highly celebrated company, Henry Ford II returned to America empty-handed and declared his desire to crush Ferrari at Le Mans. The result was a car that was going to defeat everything in front of it.

Produced for five years between 1964 and 1969, the development of the GT40 was particularly improvised. Despite its enormous wealth and production capacity, Ford as an organization had very little racing experience. Ford negotiated a deal with UK-based Lola Cars owner and chief designer Eric Broadley, sending British engineer Roy Lunn back to the UK to take a key role in the project. Overseen by American designer Harley Copp, the Broadley team, Lunn and former Aston Martin team boss John Wyer began work on the new car at the Lola Factory in Bromley. At the end of 1963, the team moved to Slough, in the new headquarters of Ford Advanced Vehicles, under the direction of Wyer. Bruce McLaren of McLaren Automotive was contracted to evaluate a prototype in August 1963 and work then proceeded rapidly. though it was barely finished in time for its opening. The first GT40, the GT/101 (the "GT40" moniker came later and was taken from the car's height: it was 40 inches tall at the top of the windshield), was introduced in England on April 1, 1964 and shortly after it was exhibited. In New York. The purchase price of the complete car for competition use was £5,200 (or £103,000 in today's money).

Testing at Le Mans a few weeks later revealed serious instability problems at high speed; the GT40 could reach 200 mph (321 km/h) but wanted to fly above 170 mph (273 km/h). His first starts at the Nürburgring, Le Mans and Reims, despite his incredible reputation, were all DNF. Late in the year, Wyer, while still making GT40s, tasked legendary former American driver Carroll Shelby with racing them. Shelby replaced the 4.2L engine with a 7.0L beast that it has already used to great success in the Cobra, paired with a new ZF transmission. Armed with its new power unit, the GT40 took its first victory at Daytona 1965 before claiming second place at Sebring. However, Le Mans was a disaster, as all five entries failed to finish due to mechanical problems.

1966 marked the beginning of the GT40 legend. A 1-2-3 victory at Daytona was quickly followed by another win at Sebring. However, it was the Le Mans crown that Ford coveted. Ford assembled an army for that year's race: nine cars, more than 100 people with 21 tons of spare parts. Ford defeated Ferrari in style, dominating the podium with the top three finishers and becoming the first American manufacturer to emerge victorious at Le Mans. Le Mans victories followed for the GT40 for three more years, establishing the GT40 as one of the most iconic racing cars of all time. Ferrari has not won at Le Mans since then.

The first 50 models ordered will be accompanied by a Giclée print of a beautiful photograph by Rainer Schlegelmilch taken in the early stages of the 1969 Le Mans 24 Hours. The Giclée print will be on archival quality art paper, with an image size approximately 30 x 83 cm (12 x 32 inches).
Even more impressive, the car that crossed the finish line victorious was not a new car made for that year. In fact, it was the exact chassis that had won Le Mans the year before at the hands of Pedro Rodríguez and Lucien Bianchi. Ickx dedicated the team's win to previous winner Bianchi, who had been killed earlier in the year. Ickx also emerged victorious after starting the race with a one-man protest against the 'Le Mans start', following the death of Porsche privateer Willy Mairisse the year before, walking to his car and taking his time buckling up. the belts.

The 1969 Le Mans Winner Ford GT40 is limited to just 199 pieces.

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Elevate your collection to 1:8 scale with one of our elegant, harmonious and handcrafted display cases, stands or pedestals.

This perfect 1:8 scale model of the Ford GT40 is based on chassis #1075, which won the 1969 24 Hours of Le Mans. Driven by Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver, car #6 recorded the longest race closest real finish in Le Mans 24 Hours history, and one of the best in all of motorsport history, beating Hans Hermann's Porsche 908 by just 120 meters (390 ft) after 372 laps. It was a classic underdog story: Porsche had already finished the World Sportscar Championship with three of the ten races to go and were heavy favorites to win Le Mans for the first time. 16 Porsches competed, more than a third of the field, and Porsche actually led 90% of the race. However, the lead 917's gearbox broke at 11 a.m. and Ickx and Oliver's Ford took the lead. The race ended in a 3-hour sprint, with the Ford battling exhaust problems while being chased by the Porsche 908 of Herrmann and Gérard Larrousse, who both faced mechanical problems affecting the brakes and engine. Ickx knew that if he headed into the Mulsanne straight, Herrmann would pass him, but he could pass him again and then hold the lead for the rest of the lap. The cars crossed the finish line with less than a minute to go, thus needing to complete one more lap. The Ford had only done 23 laps on one tank of fuel, but now it suddenly needed to gain an extra lap. Ickx feigned a lack of power from lack of fuel, letting Herrmann pass him early on the Mulsanne straight, before using the slipstream to pass him again just before the end of the 5km straight. Ickx stopped Herrmann to cross the line first, denying Porsche for another year.

Even more impressive, the car that crossed the finish line victorious was not a new car made for that year. In fact, it was the exact chassis that had won Le Mans the year before at the hands of Pedro Rodríguez and Lucien Bianchi. Ickx dedicated the team's win to previous winner Bianchi, who had been killed earlier in the year. Ickx also emerged victorious after starting the race with a one-man protest against the 'Le Mans start', following the death of Porsche privateer Willy Mairisse the year before, walking to his car and taking his time buckling up. the belts.

The 1969 Le Mans Winner Ford GT40 is limited to just 199 pieces.

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Elevate your collection to 1:18 scale with one of our elegant, harmonious and handcrafted display cases, stands or pedestals.